Friday, December 23, 2011

The Night Before Christmas ...???




Clement Clarke Moore probably didn't write it  (just like Shakespeare probably didn't write all those plays).  Literary sleuth Donald Foster investigated the Christmas poem and decided that Moore was lying. Foster found out that it was first published as "A Visit From St. Nicholas," probably by an amateur poet named Henry Livingston, Jr. of Poughkeepsie, NY in a newspaper in Troy, NY, in 1825.

Foster believes the style and cultural references are from Livingston (certainly not Moore), plus Moore didn't lay claim to the poem until 1844--after Livingston was dead--and a full 19 years after it first appeared in the Troy newspaper. Moore even asked the Troy paper if anyone remembered who wrote the poem. The Troy paper answered that anyone who knew was probably long gone.

And like Shakespeare, the identity of the creator is wrong. To find out who wrote the Shakespeare plays and poems, read my article The Masque of William Shakespeare on Amazon Kindle or Smashwords . Learn who really wrote the plays and why.

**Click either of the last two links to read an excerpt.**

Friday, November 11, 2011

10 Reasons Why William Shakespeare is a Fraud

Although the little animations may rankle you, the reasons presented below are spot on. Anonymous used such inconsistencies but wound up fingering the wrong author of the plays.


The whole story is a lot more bizarre than what's presented in the movie Anonymous. For one thing, William Shakespeare was involved in the murder of his rival. My essay The Masque of William Shakespeare explains how William Shakespeare rose to prominence in the theater right after this murder.

Read The Masque of William Shakespeare on Kindle or any other e-Reader at Smashwords


Saturday, November 5, 2011

St. Louis Experts -- Shakespeare Not Anonymous

Bruce Longworth, head of the performance program at Webster University's Conservatory of Theatre Arts, who has directed the Shakespeare Festival St. Louis' Kevin Kline-winning production of "Hamlet" in 2010, had this to say:

"Here's what I find troubling: the idea that Shakespeare had to be a nobleman with a university education. Education has never equated with imagination. If something happened to the Earl of Oxford (on a ship, similar to an episode in "Hamlet") — well, news got around. Maybe Shakespeare heard about it and used it; he was a magpie. Besides, Oxford had his own theater. Why wouldn't he give the plays to it?"





Not only did Shakespeare not have an education, he didn't even own a single book. Shakespeare never even mentioned his books or his plays in his will, but he did mention his bed. My essay The Masque of William Shakespeare explains how William Shakespeare rose to prominence in the theater and how he was involved in murder.


Read The Masque of William Shakespeare on Kindle or any other e-Reader at Smashwords. 

Friday, November 4, 2011

ANONYMOUS is a Tudor turkey!

That's what they're saying in the UK at Mail Online, giving it only one star. Why? The film presents a ludicrous premise that is unsupported by history. The reviewer says Anonymous is preposterous.


But so is William Shakespoeare, the writer. The real William Shakespeare had little or no education and never even owned a book. That's where the movie got it right--Shakespeare was most likely an illiterate baffoon. Common sense would say that the author of the greatest literature in English history needed a little education and surely should own a book or two. Doubts about Shakespeare have been expressed by Mark Twain and Sigmund Freud, to name only a few.




My essay The Masque of William Shakespeare shows that the real William Shakespeare was deeply entangled in a conspiracy that ended in murder. The evidence uncovers the actual writer of the plays...and it wasn't Shakespeare.


The Masque of William Shakespeare is available on Kindle and all other formats (IPad, Sony, Nook, amd most e-reading apps) at Smashwords.

Monday, October 31, 2011

Who Was William Shakespeare...Really?

Anonymous (the movie) claims it was Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford. Well, if it was, then de Vere was quite the prodigy because he had to have written Midsummer Night's Dream when he was only nine years old. Not likely.



So, why the controversy in the first place?  It started because the real William Shakespeare had little or no education and never even owned a book. Common sense would say that the author of the greatest literature in English history needed a little education and surely should own a book or two. Doubts about Shakespeare have been expressed by Mark Twain and Sigmund Freud, to name only a few.

My essay The Masque of William Shakespeare implicates the real William Shakespeare in a twisted conspiracy that ends in murder. Carefully documented evidence presented in my essay identifies who actually wrote those plays and why.

The Masque of William Shakespeare is available on Kindle or on Smashwords.

**(Get the whole story)**

Sunday, October 30, 2011

Cast of Anonymous Defends Film



The film is controversial because it doesn't offer believable evidence that Shakespeare was indeed Edward de Vere, the Earl of Oxford. My essay The Masque of William Shakespeare gives compelling evidence that Shakespeare was part of an elaborate conspiracy that ended in murder.

                                      **Read it at Amazon Kindle or Smashwords.**

Saturday, October 29, 2011

Anonymous--The Reviews Are In

The reviews are in, and they're not altogether flattering.  The Christian Science Monitor  reports:

 "Anonymous," set inside the nefarious political court of Elizabethan England, is about Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford (Rhys Ifans), the rightful author of the plays falsely attributed to that nincompoop imposter William Shakespeare



Here's where they expect to market Anonymous next:

 Sony Pictures is reportedly distributing Shakespeare-debunking lesson plans for literature and history teachers. "A documentary by First Folio Pictures (of which Mr. Emmerich is president) will also be part of this campaign," writes Mr. Shapiro in The New York Times

Now, just for the record, de Vere died in 1604, so his ghost must have written "Othello" and "King Lear" and "The Tempest." (It is Halloween, after all.) The real problem is that de Vere had to write "A Midsummer Night's Dream" when he was 9 years old. Ridiculous.

When you read my article The Masque of William Shakespeare on Amazon Kindle or Smashwords you will learn who really wrote the plays and why. It's thoroughly documented and more compelling than the movie.

**Click either of the last two links to read an excerpt.**

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

The Masque of William Shakespeare

Anonymous (the movie) in theaters October 28th asks the question:

Was Shakespeare a fraud?


My article The Masque of  William Shakespeare (now published on Kindle and at Smashwords) offers an exciting answer. The movie gives one possible explanation, but my article offers compelling evidence that Shakespeare was much more than a fraud. Here is the description from Amazon Kindle:



William Shakespeare was entangled in a web of espionage, false identities, and finally murder. The victim was Christopher Marlowe, Shakespeare's one and only rival. Follow the author as he presents the bizarre facts surrounding the world's greatest writer.
* Click on either link above for a story more interesting and more enlightening than the movie.